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SECOND ENLARGED CATALOGUE OF THE 

SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM COLLECTION 
OF NON-OBJECTIVE PAINTINGS 



ON EXHIBITION FROM 
FEBRUARY 8, 1937 THROUGH FEBRUARY 28, 1937 



PRESENTED BY THE 



PHILADELPHIA ART ALLIANCE 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 



The exhibition of the Solomon R. Guggenheim collection is an event of outstanding im- 
portance in the history of the Art Alliance. This is by far the most complete collection of non- 
objective painting in the world. It has never been shown in its entirety except for six weeks 
last winter, by the Carolina Art Association in the Gibbes Memorial Art Gallery, in Charles- 
ton, South Carolina. Since then many new pictures have been acquired which are included 
in this present exhibition. 

We are proud of being selected as the first to exhibit this collection in the Middle States. 

Non-objective painting forms the nearest approximation to the pure art of music. This 
creative painting has been the target of controversy from those who believe that painting 
must confine itself to the representation of objects and interpretation of subjects as well as 
from those who take exception to the entire documentation of spiritual development in the 
art of painting. 

The Art Alliance in these discussions heartily welcomes the rare opportunity of bringing 
to the attention of its members and to Philadelphians in general this remarkable and stimulat- 
ing exhibition. 

The Baroness Hilla Rebay, who organized the Guggenheim collection, has graciously 
augmented its exhibition with works from her collection. We are greatly indebted to the 
Baroness who has given her services as director of the exhibition and compiler of this catalog. 

YARNALL ABBOTT, President 

The Philadelphia Art Alliance 



Artists are listed alphabetically, the paintings chronologically. 
Biographies are given at the end. 
The Non-Obiective Paintings number 1-138 

The Paintings with an Object number 139-199. They present out- 
standing cubistic and abstract works of artists whose works led up 
to non-obiectivity. 

Titles have been translated except where the translation was 
meaningless. Titles have not been given except by the artists and 
as paintings were frequently untitled, all of the Non-Obiective 
Paintings are illustrated. 

The artists' numbers, whenever they were known, have been given 
in brackets with the year. 
Dimensions of the paintings are given in inches with the height first. 



THE BEAUTY OF NON-OBJECTIVITY 

Sense for beauty in sound and vision grows in the heart of man. The conscious use of crea- 
tive power and the realization of lawful order in the eternal universe is given to man alone. 
With sound or vision, this cosmic order can be brought into existence by the creative artist. 
He brings into reality of appearance new organizations by creating new forms and motives 
which must be sublime in their inter-relation of rhythm, line, balance, and measure. 

The masterpiece is due to its perfection. Only a creation which is organic can be a 
masterpiece; intensity of the creator's concentration for a new and singular organization 
alone can accomplish a flawless continuation of intuition from beginning to end. The great- 
ness of a masterpiece depends on the given amount of intuition and concentration. Conse- 
quently it can be strong or weak; but never good or bad: it can be liked or disliked, but 
never criticized, as one cannot criticize the moon's weaker shine in comparison to the sun. 

There is no representation of objects, nor any meaning of subjects in these paintings of free 
invention called non-objective art. They represent a unique world of their own, as creations 
with a lawful organization of colors, variation of forms, and rhythm of motif. These combina- 
tions when invented by a genius can bring the same joy, relaxation, elevation and anima- 
tion of spiritual life as music. Knowledge of point and counterpoint never was necessary for 
anyone to enjoy the beauty of music. Nor is it necessary in painting to realize the construc- 
tional law to feel pleasure in non-objective masterpieces. Everyone reacts differently to 
melodies and keys in music. The general response to the themes and keys of color in differ- 
ent non-objective paintings is of similar variety. Upon further acquaintance the appeal of a 
masterpiece attracts concentration which grows into animated enjoyment. 

Painting, like music, has nothing to do with reproduction of nature, nor interpretation of 
intellectual meanings. Whoever is able to feel the beauty of colors and forms has understood 
non-objective painting. 

Beauty of appearance takes its way to the heart through the medium of intuitive intelli- 
gence called spirit. Intellect prevents spontaneous reaction to this most elevating joy which 
sound or vision can give. To be able to penetrate further into the singular worlds of these 
paintings is to realize their lawfulness, their cosmic inner order, which, if understood, may 
increase the faculty to enjoy them. But this experience and knowledge is necessary only to 
those who want to use the fundamentals of creation to become creators of art themselves. 
Non-objectivity has beauty and spirit combined. Everyone who gives time to it is able to get 
its blessing, which is refreshment of the soul and elevation into the beyond. 

Spirit begins where materialism ends. The clear statement of absolute painting and pure 
creation in a cosmic sense shatters the illusion of worldly realism in representative painting. 
Viewpoints have changed as creators discovered world visions and turned away from con- 
templation of earth. Materialistic inspiration can never start creation, but intuition leads 
to it. 

Non-objective art need not be understood or judged. It must be felt and it will influence 
those who have eyes for the loveliness of forms and colors. Though we all enjoy sunshine, 
neither this joy nor the sun's shine have a meaning unless our intellect invents one. Neither 
a flower nor the moon can be criticized. They would never change themselves. The seed of 
the flower will continue to produce exactly the same kind despite criticism. It follows the 
intuitive order of creation. So does the non-objective masterpiece of art. It can be liked or 
disliked, but its existence is final and its perfection is beautiful. 



The positive order in a non-objective picture is no accident. The first accord defines the 
key of color and form, which has to be followed to solution. The enjoyment, animation and 
constantly growing appeal which they offer is why it is "worth the trouble" to get acquainted 
with them. That is why a man like Mr. Guggenheim, who once collected the choicest paint- 
ings of past centuries, now prefers to live with non-objective masterpieces because they offer 
him more from year to year, and satisfy his love for spiritual animation with their unending 
appeal of beauty and purity of ideal. Such a result cannot be obtained from even the finest 
representations of earthly objects, because once known, they have nothing new to say. 

The actual content of a great non-objective picture is never known, but can be felt, and 
offers new revelations year after year to be enjoyed forever. Yet it needs intuition not only 
to create such masterpieces, but also to realize their value, before the masses have been 
able to acclaim them. 

A far-sighted collector is very rare. Often the world has to wait centuries for such a man 
who discovers lasting values of timeless creations before they win admiration, respect and 
fame through the opinion of experts or public comprehension. Mr. Guggenheim, whose 
life work consists in discovering and opening up the hidden wealth of the earth, is a leader 
in the field of mining. Sometimes in spite of risks and discouragements, he continued his 
vocation to lead, with the same intuitive foresight that attracted his attention to other crea- 
tive fields: namely, the ethereal spirit of art as the counterbalance to earth. He is not only 
capable of the elevating enjoyment which non-objectivity alone can provide; but also a 
protector of genius and promoter of spiritual wealth. And so he has created a collection 
which is unique in the world for its purity, its choice and its ideal. 

The catalogue of the collection's first public exhibition created a stir in many corners of 
the world. This astonished even those who well knew the importance of this event. French, 
Italian and German daily newspapers wrote about it. Even today letters of interest and loan 
requests come in from many countries and important cities. Young people especially are 
highly interested. Many unknown international painters have since come forward to proclaim 
their interest in non-objectivity. 

For centuries the uncultivated eyes of men have been satisfied with reproductions instead 
of creations in the art of vision. Thousands of years ago the cavemen of Africa, France and 
Spain did wall decorations of animal designs in accomplished reproduction. This shows how 
little culture was needed for such realization. An unchangingly static reproductive picture 
gets tiresome because it lacks the greatest charm and wealth of nature, its constant change 
in movement and form, which makes it so elusive and dear to our hearts though familiar to 
our memory. 

A new ideal was needed, something infinitely more alive, vital and valuable to those 
longing for elevation. If advance of technique on the materialistic side of painting was taken 
for cultural development — which it was not, because culture is beyond such earthly hold- 
ings — even this technique was not of great interest to most people. Humanity resents change 
so much that technical improvement ended even a Rembrandt in the poorhouse. The laziness 
of the average mind prefers stagnation to development. 

Geniuses do not wait for consent. Their cosmic power has no patience for mediocrity. They 
induce progress and development in spite of indifference. Stagecoaches no longer fulfill the 
requirements of our day of aeroplane, radio and television. Why should our need for crea- 
tion in the art of painting be subversive to traditions of those who can only follow the 




RUDOLF BAUER, No. 27, No. 28, No. 29, No. 30, "TETRAPTYCHON" Symphony in four movements. 



familiarity of objects? That alone appeals to their eyes, bound by materialism. Apparent 
safety of intellect hinders enjoyment through real elevation. Of course, many people are 
unable to get accustomed to a higher viewpoint in the art of painting. They do not feel the 
inner need for this visionary joy of absolute beauty or else they have been misled and dis- 
appointed by the mediocrity of many such paintings. 

Seldom has there been an exhibition or collection made of this creative art that was not 
endangered by the mediocrity of works by second and third class painters, who were merely 
experimenters, but never masters of so difficult a domain. The openminded public often had 
bad rewards for its willingness. One masterpiece, sensitive as it always is, hidden away 
between twenty nonentities, is completely drowned. Only the eye of an expert would give it 
the attention due its merit. 

It is difficult for the interested public to get acquainted with this art of highest culture 
because these masterpieces are rare. It has been possible today to start a showplace with 
endlessly changed loans of pictures and call it a museum. Consequently, quantity replaces 
quality. Lack of discrimination naturally prevails due to the desperate search for something 
new to show. Directors, incapable of experienced leadership, naturally confuse and be- 
wilder the public with the entire output. Even if fine creations may be present in the mass of 
mediocre confusion, they cannot easily be recognized. Sensational publicity, often influ- 
enced by the trade in painting, cannot convince a public attracted by the ballyhoo. Works 
with no lasting value prove, soon enough, their spiritual emptiness by their lack of elevating 
influence. 

A masterpiece withstands time. Its importance grows on those who feel attracted by its 
unending life. It creates enthusiasm which spreads from soul to soul, finally bringing the 
masterpiece world renown for its superiority in an unostentatious way. To those born with 
rare sense for artistic supremacy, there is no handicap in the lack of an historical back- 
ground of a yet undiscovered masterpiece. Their conviction needs only such courage as is 
needed to fight the inexperience of aggressors. 

Historians of the past exist by the thousands, but those born to leadership of the present 
are exceptionally rare. They live, conscious of the actuality of life's happenings, and realize 
creation while it is still in progress. They judge the present, and are only interested in the 
judgment of the past for testing bygone predictions and discoveries once made. Their past 
decisions must be confirmed by the present. They realize the possibility for organic growth 
in promising talents. They watch whether painters develop or merely reach importance on a 
certain step on the ladder to greatness of spirit; and whether they gain the powerful faculty 
to say much, even in little. 




RUDOLF BAUER, No. 46, No. 47, No. 48, "TRIPTYCH" Symphony in three movements. 



The primitives already had such a faculty in painting. Through design and climax of 
accent, they often reached a very strong constructive expression. Elimination of the unessen- 
tial, culmination of the characteristic use of black and white as color, and their restraint in 
form gives these works exceptional value. (School of Avignon Chartres, Ravenna, Gaddi 
and Lorenzo di Monaco). Modern expressionists often tried in vain to reach equally strong 
solutions in their paintings. 

Painting in the Renaissance became more and more realistic and true to life. Titian and 
Raphael overflowed in succulence. Their influence is responsible for many sad distortions in 
paintings of later centuries. Leonardo's more spiritual expression created a sensitive ideal of 
earthly beauty. Michaelangelo gave powerful gestures and over-life size dimensions to his 
figures. The strength of their personality accomplished works of organic completeness, and 
are in their way masterful achievements. It influenced the ideal of beauty for the next four 
hundred years, as Byzantine style had influenced previous centuries. Painting became more 
and more realistic but less and less artistic, until, with Delacroix, the revolt began. 

In the 19th century, Delacroix made the first move to freedom of thought and technique 
from dull academism. Seurat continued with far clearer demonstrations of the search to ex- 
press the vibration of light and air with complementary colors. Yet color problems are inferior 
to form problems, because a masterpiece can be great without the charm of any color, yet 
cannot even exist without the definition of form. Seurat with his impressionistic color and 
expressionistic design, also introduced the problem of form abstraction into painting. Some of 
Seurat's works were decidedly cubistic, although he died in 1891. 

Other forerunners to the achievement of pure art were men like Gleizes, Delaunay, 
Leger, Picasso and Chagall, who fifteen years later, though still inspired by reality, used 
earthly objects merely as an inspiration. They achieved unity by the organized multiplication 
of one and the same form of cubes and called it Cubism. In Italy, Balla and Severini followed 
by abstracting into pictorial order the view of continuity of motion in moving objects and 
called it futurism. 

All these different phases of old-fashioned painting advocate the immovable form-ideal. 
The eye takes in the entire picture at one time, and the spirit cannot change or vary the 
view. From whatever angle one sees the picture it stays the same. 

The absolute picture proclaims the movable form-ideal of the age to come. Here the spirit 
moves from theme to theme, from form to form. The absolute forms, square, circle and tri- 
angle may seem easy to use, as easy as producing sound by merely touching the keyboard 
of a piano, which any child can do. Yet something far more spiritual than a keyboard, the 
inventive mind of a genius, is needed to create a sonata or a fugue. The same spiritual in- 



telligence is necessary by using absolute forms to express rhythm and to create space rela- 
tionship of perfect harmony. Feeling this harmony and rhythm is to feel universal beauty. 

Except for decidedly historical reasons which must be emphasized, when showing past 
steps of development into the advanced taste and knowledge of non-objective art, many 
isms have outlived themselves. They are now only used by painters who contribute nothing 
to the expression of our age. With some of these different former isms improvement was de- 
veloped to the highest goal in art: non-objectivity. 

One of these isms, Dadaism, has recently come to public attention. Dadaism never had 
and never wanted to be art. Twenty years ago, in Switzerland and Germany, a bourgeoise 
public reacted in wild attacks to non-objective art. Dadaism was meant to upset the layman 
by shaking him up until he realized his all too steady point of view. The first babbling of a 
child, da-da, da-da, was here glorified to express the general public's ability to understand 
art and culture. The wildest nonsense was produced in music, literature, theater and painting 
by artistically feeling people, not for serious creation, but to upset those who thought they 
knew it all. The public got confused, when told they themselves were the Dadaists. But today, 
when thousands of people are filled with admiration and respect for real art, Dadaism has 
outlived its necessity. Such exhibitions should be ignored unless definitely proclaimed as an 
historical record. 

Surrealism came in only recently, through such painters who invented this senseless title 
to stupefy the public. (Realism cannot be unearthly.) They effectively put together sensational 
attractions which are usually of decidedly bad taste. Their effort is not even sincere in its 
attempt to seem artistic. Most of the Surrealists have tried in vain to achieve non-objective 
creation but came soon to the end of their inventiveness. In their endeavor to do something 
new instead they reached for journalistic surprises. Some by using bits from magazines or 
fashion plates of the nineties, and pasting them side by side. Others distorted objects to 
represent dreams or spiritualistic nonsense. In love with intellect and sensation, which has 
nothing to do with art, they stirred the public with ridiculous ideas, but did not produce any 
valuable revelations. Because of all this insincerity and vanity they only increased their 
mediocrity. They thoroughly dislike those creators whom they cannot equal, their envy goes 
so far as to claim that art were not necessary. No wonder the public distrusts the confusion 
brought about by all this inartistic "kitch." Great art stands quietly alone. 

Abstraction is another phase, merely a forerunner of the achievement of pure art and 
entire freedom of creation in painting. Objective inspiration can go no further than abstrac- 
tion. Objective themes here are combined and dissolved almost to the point of free creation, 
yet as these pictures are still inspired by earth, they are merely abstractions; objects alone 
can be abstracted; absolute forms like circles, squares and triangles, if abstracted, would 
lose their identity. 

To feel the beauty of art, the layman does not have to know the different classifications of 
painting which paved the way to non-objectivity. In 191 1, the Russian, Vasilly Kandinsky, was 
the first painter with such intuitive and spiritual freedom as to eliminate entirely the unneces- 
sary hindrance of intellect for the art of vision. Earthly objects and intellectual subjects with 
titles and meanings, he left to photographers and poets. By entirely giving up the help of 
earthly inspiration, Kandinsky was the first to accomplish the infinitely more difficult but 
gratifying task of painting unforeseen beauty with the sole use of spirit and the intuitive sense 
for cosmic order. By inventing color, form and space combinations without intellectual 



meanings, he was the first to achieve non-objectivity. He created absolute forms for the 
realization of spiritual joy and the sole purpose of elating the sense of beauty. 

Seeing a circle does not imply sensation nor memory for any known or unknown happen- 
ing. It is no symbol and has no sense. It is a perfect form with beauty of shape. The three 
basic forms: square, triangle, circle, offer manifold possibilities for interrelation. The circle 
is a concentrated continuity in itself, isolated and floating in its own importance, not influ- 
enced by what is within or without. The square has eight sides, four within and four without. 
It gives and receives space, and also points with its corners in further directions. The square, 
it seems, is a more spiritual form in relationship to space. The triangle, perhaps, less spiritual, 
emphasizes by pointing from an indifferent base. These are perfected absolute forms of 
purity and beauty. 

They have no meaning unless geometry lends these forms to demonstrate visually the re- 
lation of figures to each other, but in geometry the proportion of the number is all that is of 
importance. So no beauty is accomplished and no spiritual life created. Non-objective forms 
are accidental tools of science. In art there is no accident in the use or shape of forms. It 
may seem simple to make a composition with primary forms, yet the artistic value of a crea- 
tion lies in the combination and is brought to spiritual life only by rhythm and space rela- 
tionship. 

Non-objective pictures, being worlds of their own, have no meaning, and represent 
nothing. They are lovely or unpleasant to our eyes as music is lovely or disagreeable to our 
ears. People react differently to the appeal of motifs and melodies. It is as difficult to get 
acquainted with many non-objective paintings at one time, as it would be, to hear all 
Beethoven's nine symphonies in succession for the first time. But to a connoisseur, this treat 
would bring new enjoyment by comparing details and different variations of motives in 
different keys. 

To paint a weak non-objective painting is very easy, but to create a masterpiece is the 
most difficult accomplishment in creative art. The perfection of composition and the wealth of 
invention as shown in each work of Rudolf Bauer has never been reached by anyone be- 
fore, nor is there such perfection likely to be reached again. Geniuses are phenomenons of 
nature. Bauer, the greatest master of non-objectivity rules equally all techniques and ac- 
complishments of past epochs in reproductive painting. All the different isms that lead to non- 
objectivity are at his command at any time. 

Great epochs are only created with a culmination of genius. To overthrow the known 
accomplishments of the past one must be able to rule them. Once overthrown, many are able 
to forge ahead to known heights. But genius is needed to introduce an unknown epoch. 

The sensation of the object has outlived itself. The minds are tired of too much reality, 
brought to us confusingly and without effort. There is no rest unless we lift our eyes to the sky 
whose purity and endlessness demands no meaning from our harassed intellect. The child of 
this century is bored by representations, unless they move constantly, changing with unex- 
pected thrills, as offered by the motion pictures. Reproductive painting formerly was neces- 
sary to offer to the earthly intellect views of lovely situations and compositions with design, 
light, shadow and color simplification. All this now is given by photographs and color- 
prints while in addition, the movies offer the nearest perfection for representing natural life 
in fiction. 

The solution of color and form problems with which cinema and cartoons satisfy our long- 



ing for inspiration, love for surprise, and sense of poetical imagination, is offered without 
demand for recognition as accomplishment of art. Interest and admiration for realistic paint- 
ing, since reproductions, photographs and movies satisfy so much of what skill in repro- 
ductive painting alone used to offer, has so diminished that we begin to love our walls, 
freed of them. 

The simple style of today with modern furniture, big windows, balance of light and space, 
is also due to our greater demand for rest. The non-objective masterpiece is the only picture 
which does not spoil this harmony. It relaxes the fatigued intellect and elevates the sense of 
beauty beyond mundane happenings. Once people live with it, its quiet work begins. Sub- 
consciously it transfers rhythm. Through order of spacing, perfection of harmonies, and 
beauty of color, the eye follows unforeseen motives and studies a variety of interesting 
forms. Pleasure for beauty opens our eyes to the order of a movable form-ideal. The mind 
returns to earth, relaxed, refreshed, and even spiritually improved. The same sublime ele- 
vating influence as imposed on us by the starlit sky, makes us forget the pettiness and 
banality as imposed by earth. The same solemn experience of uplift and forgetfulness from 
material things will occur to those who are able to live with these absolute creations of 
paintings. They will gain through them spiritual development and a strengthening for their 
own intuitive leadership. 

Realistic painting is relatively dull, because it is an interpretation of earthly things well 
known to everyone. On the other hand, non-objective pictures are definitely new, even to the 
creator. The layman, standing behind a painter, copying nature, sees the picture before it 
has been painted, but when he stands behind a creative artist, he sees nothing of the non- 
objective painting if it has not yet been created. 

The love for objective painting is only a personal and private affair. It is of no importance 
to the world's improvement what object a painter chooses for a reproductive picture, or 
whether that representation later appeals to others. They are merely dealing with earthly 
inspirations and materialistic likes or dislikes of no educational value to influence the public. 
The non-objective picture is of world importance due to its educational faculty. This im- 
portance does not derive from the quality of beauty in such a painting, but from its beneficial 
effect on the human race through the welfare of its educational power to elevate up to the 
immaterialistic plane and to strengthen and develop the creative gift. It has the importance of 
world vision, compared to the irrelevance of earthly viewpoints. It influences human im- 
provement of balance, stimulates the sense for intuitive guidance and fortifies the highest 
intelligence. 

Due to nature's everlasting change of light, color, movement and form the painter who 
tries to catch its charm gets anxious in his restless hunt for original motifs. Not at any time 
does he relax in order to get the benefit of nature's powerful influence of serenity, which 
would strengthen and increase the benefit of his intuitive capacity. The painter of non-objec- 
tivity does receive this benefit as he is freed of this constantly erratic strife for new patterns 
from nature in the hope that some may have been overlooked in the reproductive urge. 

Objective painters desperately hope for singularity, despite the previous efforts of untold 
thousands of painters. Even Van Gogh, with his vital technique, could not stir interest for his 
shoes or pipe by painting them. The pitiful impression that mass exhibitions with unnecessary 
quantities of mediocre paintings produce, are full of tokens of this ridiculous search for origi- 
nality. Objects cannot offer originality since nature offers the superior pattern. What 428,000 

10 



people paint cannot be art! Art is unique and only few geniuses are born. Art and nature 
are two worlds as different as eternity and transitoriness. 

Creation of art is so definitely conscious that even accident of charm is impossible and 
contrary to the concentrated order which is the foundation of creation. Many painters delight 
in this accidental charm, which often comes about unexpectedly in painting. Neither Bauer's 
nor Shwab's works ever submit to that. Thus each of their works is utter perfection. Concen- 
tration and order has to be felt in every part of the picture. Every inch of the given space is 
so important that it comes to life in organic rhythm, whether it is in form or space. 

An artist with creative experience and fundamental feeling for art's laws can recognize a 
genius before others. In realizing the spiritual limitations which handicap himself he is con- 
scious of the advance of genius. His struggle to gain the same perfection rarely succeeds be- 
cause masters are born. The vocation of a born genius is to lead to new visions of beauty. 
He seems to have a longer breath with which to achieve in apparent ease, further climaxes 
of power, and still has lots to say where others fall silent. 

The genius follows his conscience to his pre-ordained destination, and does not need 
sensation. He develops his masterfulness to stronger power, greater simplicity, and superi- 
ority of technical experience. His whole life is dedicated to the endless task of increasing 
and perfecting his faculties. By increasing accomplishments, the vision of further possibilities 
is enlarged. With cruel self-discipline a born master responds to a sensitive conscience by 
his unending devotion to the goal of perfection and beauty. All of his existence consists of 
hard work to reach beauty and increase spiritual wealth on earth. He foresees the necessity 
of new demands which humanity develops, and usually fulfills this demand long before it is 
made. Yet often for this reason dies in obscure poverty. 

Capacity for creative power, technical quality and honest deference to the unending 
possibilities of progress, sense of climax, wisdom for elimination and diligence combined 
with the unsophistication of a child, are the makeup of genius, the prophet of the spirit. 

Though the masses proudly enjoy a nation's fame for culture, they usually are the last to 
deserve it. Culture is always created by great personalities; they are usually neither helped 
nor understood by the masses, who merely benefit from culture as an attractor of inter- 
national admirers who bring trade to a center of fame. 

Big ideas are almighty! There was never such need for them as now, when the whole 
world is trying to fill a distinct vacuum, and is craving for a new ideal to counterbalance the 
development of civilization with its lack of cultural influence on human worth. The great ease 
in fulfilling the requirements of earthly life, which modern civilization gives to the mind, has 
freed culture to greater possibilities for progress. Our style of living has given the average 
man such comforts as kings did not used to dream of. Since machinery, electricity, and avia- 
tion were invented, the most incredible accomplishments of civilization are familiar to us. 
Glass, concrete and steel are used to build. A new style has come about which is the first 
entirely original one, since the Greeks with their columns and Acanthus leaves influenced all 
styles thereafter. 

Today balance of dimension and proportion, simplicity of line and interval, have become 
necessary to our sense of beauty. People begin to expect their homes to be light, restful and 
joyous. The houses provide a cleaner, easier, healthier way of living. A different standard has 
changed surroundings and viewpoints, even of the average person. Yet our wall decor is 
usually centuries behind. The more hectic our life becomes through the rapid impressions we 

1 1 



get, the more our nerves need the contrast of repose and materialistic forgetfulness at home. 
This solace comes to us through frequent experience with absolute art and its simplicity, re- 
finement and spiritual wealth. These pictures finally respond to our e ery mood. It happens 
to anyone who lives with them and waits for the experience. Then home life is a constant 
pleasure and elevating joy. 

One cannot with words transfer this experience to anyone else. It takes time, opportunity, 
and sometimes even development to feel these creations. The startling advent of the first 
experience in feeling beauty in a non-objective picture seems to take a veil off eye, mind 
and soul, thus opening new vistas of joy beyond all former experience. Some gifted people 
feel it at once. To others it may come late, and never to those who lack sense for beauty, 
unless these pictures develop it. One has to give it time, but not everyone wants to do that, 
particularly as it is difficult to imagine the joy which it finally brings. There are, fortunately, 
many people who admit not being musically gifted, but few, unfortunately, who ever admit 
that they are unable to feel the art in painting. 

Leonardo da Vinci in his "Tractat of Painting" wrote that the art of painting is superior to 
the art of music. That may be the reason music reached a high point in spirituality so much 
earlier than painting. It took centuries longer to bring about the high standard of visual crea- 
tion, which is needed for the present achievement in painting. The sound of music, being time- 
bound, once occurred, is gone forever. Few are gifted enough to memorize each tone once 
produced. Though its creation is quiet in the mind of genius, the performance produces 
sound. We all know that even the best performance of music may become disturbing. The 
timeless quietness of a painting surpasses the finest music for this reason. Earth turns, day 
and night follow each other without any sound. Creation occurs in perfect quiet. The silence 
of painted creations demonstrates its powerful superiority to musical sound. 

The faculty of sight is our greatest gift. The eye is the primary inlet and outlet of the 
spirit. The eye cannot only see. It speaks, laughs and weeps. It expresses confidence, mis- 
trust, sincerity and falsehood. It can hypnotize or transfer thoughts. It gives signs in many 
ways, and yet can voluntarily refuse to do so by closing its lid. The eye is therefore a su- 
perior organ to the ear, which only has the one faculty of hearing, yet no reaction by will- 
power for self-protection nor any faculty of expression. 

Musicians rarely paint while most painters are musicians besides. While the finest crea- 
tions in the art of sound were accomplished centuries ago by Bach and Beethoven, great 
advancement of culture was still needed to overcome the earth-bound rule of intellectuality, 
and educate the eye to its greatest faculty for visualizing intuition. Mental progress was 
needed before the eye saw spiritual life in the combinations of absolute forms. Most people 
when they want to see a picture read the title first to understand the meaning of the situa- 
tion represented therein. Due to its intriguing title and object, a picture may please them 
even though the workmanship of the painting may lack all artistic quality. 

Those people are not interested in the art of painting, yet they consider their love for 
pictorial entertainment an artistic enterprise of good will, and, therefore, feel proudly en- 
titled to authority in judgment of art. 

It is indeed cruelty to offer some people real art, because the lack of title, meaning and 
intellectual entertainment confuses them beyond words. It angers their imaginary righteous 
demand for the easy satisfaction to which they have become accustomed. The positiveness 
of their point of view can hardly be shaken. It is very hard for them to overcome this handi- 

12 



cap, as they give their intuitive feeling no opportunity to develop. Because it is so simple to 
sense the diverting display on earth in realistic painting, their eyes are misled and spiritual 
joy through vision becomes delayed. 

Today demands go further. Already many people use their eyes for spiritual elevation 
and enjoy forms because they are beautiful in themselves or in their interrelationship of 
space. Intuitive concentration through great art ought to be taught in schools; there, intellect, 
memory and knowledge alone are stressed as important, while intuition is not developed, 
thus accounting for many catastrophies. The wish for intellectual inspiration is of secondary 
importance considering the poor results it brings about. Spiritual development is of primary 
importance to the real goal of humanity. 

In some countries non-objective art was almost persecuted. Brainstorms arose which can 
be compared in intensity with those of the Inquisition of the Middle Ages. The passion which 
non-objective art often created can be aroused only by the spiritual importance of re- 
ligious conflicts. 

Creation in painting is far more concerned with religion than is generally recognized. 
Like all great ages, ours is a religious one. Non-objectivity will be the religion of the future. 
Very soon the nations on earth will turn to it in thought and feeling and develop such intuitive 
powers which lead them to harmony. 

Non-objective paintings are prophets of spiritual life. Those who have experienced the 
joy they can give possess such inner wealth as can never be lost. This is what these master- 
pieces in their quiet absolute purity can bring to all those who learn to feel their unearthly 
donation of rest, elevation, rhythm, balance and beauty. 

HILLA REBAY 



13 



15 



1 RUDOLF BAUER 

Presto (1917-1922) 

Oil on canvas. 59 x 78V 2 



2 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1922) 

Watercolor and tempera. 9 x 1 1% 

Rebay collection 



3 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1922) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 14% x 10% 

Rebay collection 



4 RUDOLF BAUER 
White Fugue (1922-1927) 
Oil on canvas. 52% x 76Yi 



5 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1923) 

Oil on canvas. 37 x 4372 






SEE PLATE ON PAGE 79 





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6 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1923) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19% x 12 5 / 8 

Rebay collection 



7 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1923) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 9% x 12 

Rebay collection 



8 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1923) 
Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 18 x 11% 

Rebay collection 



9 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1924) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 8y 8 x 12% 

Rebay collection 



16 



10 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1924) 

Oil on canvas. 35% x 28 




11 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1924) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 18'/ 8 x ll 5 /8 

Rebay collection 




*£?»«■ 



12 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1924) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19% x 12% 

Rebay collection 




17 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 85 





' jT^ ^ vim-' 

1 /"T^ v-: tf ^ 



13 RUDOLF BAUER 
Lyrical Picture (1924-1925) 
Oil on canvas. 33 Vi x 39% 



14 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1925) 

Watercolor and tempera. 12% x 9 



IV 



15 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1925) 

Watercolor, and Chinese ink. 20 5 /s * 147s 




16 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1925) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17Vs * 12% 



18 



19 



17 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1925) 

Watercolor. 1 8% x 1 1 y 2 

Rebay collection 



18 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1925) 

Watercolor and tempera. 1 7 n /s x 12/2 

Rebay collection 



19 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1926) 

Watercolor and tempera. 19% x 12% 

Rebay collection 



/>: 







20 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1926) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19% x 13% 

Rebay collection 




21 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1926) 

Watercolor and tempera. 12/2 x 8 5 /s 

Rebay collection 




22 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1926) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17% x 1 2 1 /2 

Rebay collection 



20 



23 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1926) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19 5 /sx 12% 

Rebay collection 



24 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1926) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19/2 x 13% 

Rebay collection 



21 



25 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1926-1927) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17% x 12% 

Rebay collection 




>D. 






SEE PLATE NO. 27 ON PAGE 59 



SEE TETRAPTYCHON PLATE ON PAGE 6 




26 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1926-1930) 
Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17Vi x 12 5 /s 

Rebay collection 



RUDOLF BAUER 

Tetraptychon (1926-1930) 

Oil on canvas — each painting 51 % x 51 % 

27 Scherzo 28 Allegro 

29 Andante 30 Allegretto 



31 RUDOLF BAUER 

Cosmic Pleasures (1927) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 18% x HVs 

Rebay collection 



32 RUDOLF BAUER 

In Memory (1927) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 9% x 12% 

Rebay collection 



22 



23 



33 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1927) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 12%x8V2 

Rebay collection 



34 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1927) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19 5 / 8 x 12% 

Rebay collection 



35 RUDOLF BAUER 

Light and Heavy (1928) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17% x 12y 2 









36 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1928) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17% x 12/2 

Rebay collection 



37 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1928) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 18% x 12ys 

Rebay collection 



38 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1928) 

Watercolor, tempera, Chinese ink and paper. 20/2 x 14% 

Rebay collection 



24 



25 



39 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1929) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17% x 12y 2 

Rebay collection 



40 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1929) 

Watercolor and Chinese ink. 18% x ll 5 / 8 



41 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1929) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17% x 12% 

Rebay collection 






X 




SEE PLATE ON PAGE 53 




42 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1930-1932) 

Oil on canvas. 51 % x 51 % 



43 RUDOLF BAUER 

Red Circle (1930-1932) 

Oil on canvas. 51 % x 51 % 



44 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1930-1932) 

Oil on canvas. 51 % x 51 % 




45 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1931) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19% x 12 5 / 8 



SEE TRYPTICH PLATE ON PAGE 7 



46 47 48 RUDOLF BAUER 

Triptych (1930-1934) 

Oil on canvas — each painting 51% x 61 



26 



27 



49 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1930-1932) 

Oil on canvas. 51 % x 51 } A 

Rebay collection 



50 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1931) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 19% x 127s 



51 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1931) 

Watercolor. 1714x1 2y 2 



52 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1931) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17ysx 12% 






SEE PLATE ON PAGE 84 




'-.•/•- 



53 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1932) 

Watercolor. 13 5 / 8 xl8y 8 

Rebay collection 




54 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1933) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 15% x 19% 

Rebay collection 




55 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1933) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. I8/2 x 17/2 




56 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1933) 

Watercolor, tempera and Chinese ink. 17% x 13/2 

Rebay collection 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 61 



57 RUDOLF BAUER 

Blue Balls (1934-1935) 

Oil on canvas. 50% x 50% 



28 



58 RUDOLF BAUER 

(1935) 

Oil on canvas. 50% x 50% 



59 RUDOLF BAUER 
Colored Swinging (1935) 
Oil on canvas. 50 3 / 4 x 60% 

60 RUDOLF BAUER 
Delicacies (1935) 

Oil on canvas. 53% x 35% 

61 RUDOLF BAUER 
(1935) Black and Yellow 
Oil on canvas. 50% x 50% 



29 



62 RUDOLF BAUER 
Scherzo (1936) 
Watercolor. 17 x 12y 2 



63 RUDOLF BAUER 
Light Circle (1936) 
Oil. 47% x 47% 




• • ^ 



SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


65 


SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


55 


SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 83 





SEE PLATE ON PAGE 63 




SEE PLATE ON PAGE 57 






*m 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 86 



64 RUDOLF BAUER 

Points (1936) 

Oil. 491/2 x4iy 2 

65 RUDOLF BAUER 
Red Triangle (1936) 

Oil. 491/2 x 41 y 2 



66 RUDOLF BAUER 

Red Point (1936) 

Oil. 50x50 



67 RUDOLF BAUER 

Three Points (1936) 

Oil. 40 x 75 



68 ALBERT GLEIZES 
"Voltige Aerienne" (1917) 
Oil on canvas. 39% x 29% 




69 ALBERT GLEIZES 

(1921) 

Oil on canvas. 35 x 27% 

Rebay collection 



30 



31 



70 ALBERT GLEIZES 
(1927) 

Tempera. 6V2 x 5 
Rebay collection 



71 ALBERT GLEIZES 
(1927) 

Tempera. 6 x 4/2 
Rebay collection 



72 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Religious Painting (1929) 
Oil on canvas. 78'/2 x 60 







SEE PLATE ON PAGE 76 







SEE PLATE ON PAGE 75 



SEE PLATE ON PAGE 77 




SEE PLATE ON PAGE 71 



73 ALBERT GLEIZES 

Composition (1930) 

Oil. 75x45 



74 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Improvisation (1912) 

Oil. 45 x 62y 2 



75 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Great Fugue (1913) 

oil. 5oy 2 x 5oy 2 



76 VASILY KANDINSKY 
The White Edge (1913) 

Oil on canvas. 55 x 75y 2 

77 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Light Picture (1913) 
Oil on canvas. 30% x 39% 



78 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Picture with Three Spots (No. 196, 1913) 

Oil on canvas. 47 x 43 



79 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Black Lines (1913) 

Oil on canvas. 50y 2 x 50y 2 



32 



33 



80 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Lyrical Invention (1918) 

Tempera and Chinese ink. 10/8 x 13/2 

Rebay collection 



81 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1918) 

Watercolor. 9 3 / 8 x 13/2 

Rebay collection 



82 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1922) 

Watercolor. 17% x 16/8 



83 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1922) 

Watercolor. 17%xl5y 4 



84 VASILY KANDINSKY 
(1923) No. 259 
Oil. 37% x 36 





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SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 78 


SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 


82 




85 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1923) 

Watercolor and Chinese ink. 14% x 9% 

Rebay collection 



86 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1923) 

Watercolor and ink. 16 x 12 

Rebay collection 

87 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Composition 8 (No. 260, 1923) 

Oil on canvas. 54/2 x 78/2 

88 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Emphasized Corners (No. 247, 1923 

Oil on canvas. 53% x 50% 
Rebay collection 



89 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(1924) 

Watercolor and Chinese ink. 13/2x9% 

Rebay collection 



90 VASILY KANDINSKY 
One Center (1924) 

Oil. 541/2 x 38i/ 2 

91 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Above and Left (1925) 
Oil.27y 4 xl9i/ 2 



SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 81 


SEE 


PLATE 


ON 


PAGE 69 





35 



92 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Light Unity (No. 308, 1925) 
Oil on cardboard. 27V 2 x 19/ 2 



93 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Pointed and Round (No. 293, 1925) 
Oil on cardboard. 27/ 2 x 19 3 / 4 




SEE PLATE ON PAGE 73 



94 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Pointed Accents (No. 342, 1926) 
Oil on canvas. 30% x 49 



95 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Confirming (No. 355, 1926) 
Oil on canvas. 17% x 21 





a\$4A 



96 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Floating (No. 395, 1927) 

Oil on cardboard. 15% x 18 7 / 8 







SEE PLATE ON PAGE 87 



97 VASILY KAND1NSKY 

Dull Violet (1927) 
Watercolor. 19x12% 



98 VASILY KANDINSKY 

"Schichtenweise" (1928) 

Watercolor. 19V 8 xl2% 

Rebay collection 




99 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Glowing Up (No. 327, 1928) 

Watercolor and Chinese ink. 18x19% 




100 VASILY KANDINSKY 

(No. 456, 1929) 

Oil on cardboard. 13% x 9% 

Rebay collection 



101 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Light Blue (No. 443, 1929) 
Oil on canvas. 20% x 26% 



102 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Light and Heavy (No. 457, 1929) 
Oil on cardboard. 19% x 19% 



103 VASILY KANDINSKY 
For and Against (No. 461, 1929) 
Oil on cardboard. 13% x 19% 



37 



104 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Long Stripe (1930) 
Watercolor. 20 x 15y 2 
Rebay collection 







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105 VASILY KANDINSKY 

"Kaum"(No.492, 1930) 

Tempera on plaster. 13 x 6% 

Rebay collection 



106 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Light Blue (1931) 

Watercolor. 15x18/2 

Rebay collection 



107 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Three Arrows (1931) 

Watercolor. 18%x12y 2 

Rebay collection 



38 



108 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Green on Green (1932) 
Watercolor.20y 2 xl2y 2 



109 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Dreamlike (1932) 

Watercolor. 20 3 / 4 xl2y 2 
Rebay collection 



110 VASILY KANDINSKY 

VoltigefNo. 612, 1935) 

Oil with sand on canvas. 32 x 39 



39 



111 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Accompanied Contrasts (No. 613, 1935) 
Oil with sand on canvas. 38% x 64 




• • 






> m 






112 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Little Balls (No. 555, 1935) 

Watercolor. 18x9 



113 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Grill (1935) 

Tempera. 20 x 12/2 

Rebay collection 



114 VASILY KANDINSKY 

Violet and Orange (1935) 

Oil. 35x46 



40 



41 



115 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Two Circles (1935) 
Oil. 28!/ 2 x 35 



116 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Accent Vert (No. 623, 1935) 
Oil. 32 x 39y 2 

117 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Rigid and Bent (1936) 

Oil. 45 x 64 



118 PAUL KLEE 

Inscription (1926) 

Watercolor and Chinese ink. 8% x 5% 

Rebay collection 



119 FERNAND LEGER 
Fugue Composition (1918) 
Watercolor. 13 x9y 2 





A^y* 


■ 


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SEE PLATE ON PAGE 67 




SEE PLATE ON PAGE 



120 FERNAND LEGER 

Composition (1925) 

Oil on canvas. 50 Vi x 37'/ 2 




121 FERNAND LEGER 

(1930) 

Watercolor. 13 3 / 8 x16y 2 

Rebay collection 




122 LADISLAUS MOHOLY-NAGY 

Tl (1926) 

Oilontrollit.58y 2 xl7 




123 LADISLAUS MOHOLY-NAGY 

(1927) 

Watercolor and Chinese ink. 11 xl5y 2 

Rebay collection 



42 



124 LADISLAUS MOHOLY-NAGY 

Tp2(1930) 

Oil on trollit. 24 x 56 3 / 4 




125 LADISLAUS MOHOLY-NAGY 

Tpl (1930) 

Oil on trollit. 24x56% 




126 LADISLAUS MOHOLY-NAGY 

Tp3(1930) 

Oil on trollit. 5 5 / 8 x 11% 

Rebay collection 




127 OTTO NEBEL 
Quintetto (1934) 
Watercolor. 15 x 12V 2 




43 



128 BEN NICOLSON 

(1912) 

Oil on wood. 10x11 




129 BEN NICOLSON 
Composition 
Plaster. 6% x 10 




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130 PABLO PICASSO 

Composition (1918) 

Oil. 131/2x101/2 



131 HILLA REBAY 

Improvisation (1922) 
Paper and watercolor. 1 1 3 / 8 x 8% 



132 HILLA REBAY 

Scherzo (1924) 

Paper and watercolor. 1 1 % x 8% 



133 HILLA REBAY 

Fugue (1934) 
Watercolor. 10 7 / 8 xl3y 8 



44 



134 HILLA REBAY 

(1931) 

Paper and watercolor. 9% x 8 3 /a 




135 SHWAB 
Construction (1928) 
Oil. 19y 4 x 35% 




136 SHWAB 
Construction II (1928) 
Oil. 21x31% 




137 EDWARD WADSWORTH 
Composition (1930) 
Tempera. 24% x 39 3 / l 




45 



138 EDWARD WADSWORTH 
Composition (1930) 
Tempera. 24% x 34% 




PAINTINGS WITH AN OBJECT 



139 HEINRICH CAMPENDONK 
Saturday (1918) 

Watercolor. W/ B x'\8% 

140 MARC CHAGALL 
land the Village (1911) 
Watercolor. 1 1 % x 8% 
Rebay collection 

141 MARC CHAGALL 
Menageries (1912) 
Watercolor. 12% x 6% 

142 MARC CHAGALL 

Paris through the Window (1913) 
Oil on canvas. 52% x 54% 

143 MARC CHAGALL 
The Remembrance (1914) 
Watercolor. 6V2 x 13/2 
Rebay collection 

144 MARC CHAGALL 
Pleasure of Life (1914) 
Oil. 34x22 

145 MARC CHAGALL 
The Tomb (1914) 

Etching and watercolor. 4x9 
Rebay collection 

146 MARC CHAGALL 
Birthday (1915) 

Oil. 31 y 2 x 31% 

147 MARC CHAGALL 
Night (1917) 

Oil. 6x9 
Rebay collection 

148 MARC CHAGALL 
Flying Carriage (1918) 
Watercolor. 7 x 9/2 
Rebay collection 

149 MARC CHAGALL 
The Green Violinist (1918) 
Oil. 77 x 42/2 

150 MARC CHAGALL 
The Dream (1920) 
Watercolor. W/ 2 x 17 
Rebay collection 

151 MARC CHAGALL 
Family Portrait (1922) 
Watercolor. 8x 10 
Rebay collection 

152 MARC CHAGALL 
Festival (1922) 

Etching and watercolor. 10x7 
Rebay collection 



153 MARC CHAGALL 
Love Pleasure (1925) 
Drawing. 10 x 12 
Rebay collection 

154 MARC CHAGALL 
The Pink Seat (1930) 
Oil. 28/2 x 23 

155 MARC CHAGALL 
In the Snow (1930) 
Watercolor. 13x9y 2 
Rebay collection 

156 MARC CHAGALL 
Country Fete (1930-1932) 

Illustration for "The Fables of La Fontaine' 
Gouache. 19%x24% 

157 MARC CHAGALL 
The Village Street (1931) 
Oil. 15x18 

158 MARC CHAGALL 
My Native House (1935) 

Oil. 451/2 X 34/2 

159 MARC CHAGALL 
The Lovers (1935-1936) 
Oil. 211/2 x 15 

Rebay collection 

160 ROBERT DELAUNAY 
Eiffel Tower (1910) 

Oil on canvas. 77% x 53 

161 ROBERT DELAUNAY 
V/indows (1912) 

Oil 2iy 2 x 18 
Rebay collection 

162 LYONAL FEININGER 
Sardine Fisherman (1933) 
Watercolor. 11x9 

163 LYONAL FEININGER 
Composition I (1933) 
Watercolor. 6x11 

164 LYONAL FEININGER 
Fourmasted Schooner (1934) 
Watercolor. 24% x 15% 

165 LYONAL FEININGER 
Ship under sail II (1935) 
Oil. 17x101/2 

166 ALBERT GLEIZES 

Portrait of a military Doctor (1914) 
Oil. 37x40 

167 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Spanish Dancer (1916) 
Oil on canvas. 39% x 29% 



46 



PAINTINGS WITH AN OBJECT 



168 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Three Themes (1916) 
Tempera. 7'/ 8 x 5 5 / 8 

169 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Equilibrium Variations (1916) 
Oil. 37x47 

170 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Herein Port (1917) 
Oil. 60x47 

171 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Acrobats (1917) 

Oil. 47 x 38% 

172 ALBERT GLEIZES 
Abstraction of Equestrian (1916) 
Oil. 39% x 29y 4 

173 VASILY KANDINSKY 
Winter study with Church (1911) 
Oil. 17%xl2% 

174 PAUL KLEE 
Lightning (1920) 
Watercolor. Il%x7% 

175 PAUL KLEE 

Hut on Mountain (1922) 
Watercolor. 21 '/ 2 x 18% 

176 PAUL KLEE 
Tropical Culture (1923) 
Watercolor. 19x8 

177 PAUL KLEE 

The end of the Marionette (1927) 
Watercolor and ink. 12% x 18 

178 PAUL KLEE 

"Erinneraedchen" (1929) 
Watercolor and ink. 12 x 14% 

179 FERNAND LEGER 
Composition (1920) 
Watercolor. 7% x 8 7 / 8 

180 FERNAND LEGER 
Composition (1918) 
Watercolor. 13x9% 

181 FERNAND LEGER 
Composition (1926) 
Watercolor. 1 1 x 4% 

182 FRANZ MARC 
Black Wolves (1913) 
Watercolor. 17 x 14% 

183 AMEDEO MODIGLIANi 
The Boy in the Blue Vest 

Oil on canvas. 36V 2 x 24% 

184 AMEDEO MODIGLIANI 
The Yellow Sweater 

Oil on canvas. 25'/ 2 x 36% 



185 AMEDEO MODIGLIANI 
Portrait of Beatrice Hastings 
Drawing. 12x7% 

Rebay collection 

186 PABLO PICASSO 
Landscape Seret (1914) 

Oil. 45y 2 x 193/4 

187 PABLO PICASSO 

Pierrot (1911) 
Oil. 50x34 

188 PABLO PICASSO 
Abstraction (1918) 

Oil. 14x11 

189 PABLO PICASSO 
Lemmon (1927) 

Oil. 7 x 51/4 

190 PABLO PICASSO 
Fruit Bowl (1908) 

Oil. 25% x 28y 4 

191 HILLA REBAY 
The Tiger Cat (1933) 
Paper. 16%xl3y 8 

192 HILLA REBAY 
Relaxation (1924) 

Paper and watercolor. 16% x 13% 

193 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
The Ape (1884) 

Study for "Grande Jatte" 
Pencil drawing. 7 5 / 8 x 6'/ 8 

194 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
(1885) 

Drawing. 11% x 9 

195 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
(1887) 

Drawing. 8% x 1 1 % 

196 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
Drawing. 9% x 12% 

197 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
Peasant Woman (c. 1883) 

Oil on canvas. 15x18 

198 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
The Door (1888) 

Pencil Drawing. 11% x 8% 

199 GEORGES-PIERRE SEURAT 
Bending Soldier (1881-1882) 
Drawing. 6% x 4y 8 

Rebay collection 



47 



BIOGRAPHIES 

BAUER, Rudolph. Born in Lindenwald, Germany, 1889. At the age of twelve he worked as 
a cartoonist. For a short time he studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Berlin. He became 
famous in Europe as a designer for humorous publications. Later known for his caricatures 
and for his work in Academism, Impressionism, Expressionism and Cubism, finally developing 
to non-objectivity of which he is an outstanding exponent. His paintings were exhibited in 
the Glasspalast, Berlin, 1915-1919. He exhibited as a member of the "Sturm" also in Japan, 
Sweden, Italy and Switzerland and many other countries from 1915 to 1920. He became a 
member of the "Krater" in 1921. In 1927 he exhibited in the Kgl. Schloss, Berlin. In 1929 he 
founded the Geistreich, a private museum of non-objectivity in Berlin. Bauer has lectured in 
several German universities and museums, and for the "Volks Buehne," Berlin. He lately 
refused invitations for one-man exhibitions in Rome and Milan, to be sponsored by Marinetti, 
in Vienna and in Paris. He is the author of "Die Kosmische Bewegung" in "Expressionismus 
die Kunstwende," Berlin, 1918; "Manifest der Malerei," Berlin, 1921; "Das Geistreich," 
Berlin, 1931; and "Eppur si muove," Berlin, 1935. He lives in Berlin. 

CAMPENDONK, Heinrich. Born in Krefeld in 1889, where he studied with Prikker. From 1911 
to 1914 he lived in Sindelsdorf. He has worked with Franz Marc and Kandinsky. He exhibited 
at the "Blauer Reiter" exhibition in Munich in 1912. He lived in Seeshaupt from 1916 to 1933 
and during that time taught at the Academy of Dusseldorf. He is at present a teacher at the 
Ryksakademie in Amsterdam. 

CHAGALL, Marc. Born in Vitebsk, Russia, 1887. He first began painting in 1907, studying 
under Bakst in Saint Petersburg. He came to Paris in 1910, where he exhibited in the Salon 
des Independants, 1911-1914. In 1913 he executed a mural painting for the Jewish theatre in 
Moscow. His first one-man show was organized by the "Sturm" in Berlin, during the spring of 
1914. In the same year he returned to Russia, living there until 1922. He founded the Beaux 
Arts School in Vitebsk. He returned to Paris in 1929. His paintings were recently exhibited in 
Basel, Switzerland, in 1931, and in London in 1935, in important one-man exhibitions. Among 
the books he has illustrated are "Dead Souls," by Gogol, and "The Fables of la Fontaine" 
(Editions Vollard). He lives in Paris. 

DELAUNAY, Robert. Born in Paris, 1882. His paintings first were exhibited in the Salon des 
Independants in 1908. He took an important part in the Cubist movement and again ex- 
hibited with the Independants in 1911. His first cubistic pictures, the "Eiffel Tower" and "St. 
Severin," were painted in 1910; "Les Fenetres," in 1912. His illustrations for books include 
those for the poems of Apollinaire and of Blaise Cendrars, "Transsiberian," by B. Huidobro, 
and "Alio, Paris!", by Joseph Delteil (Editions des Quatre Chemins). He lives in Paris. 

FEININGER, Lyonal. Born in New York, 1871. Came to Hamburg, Germany in 1888 to study 
music, but decided to study painting at the Royal Academy in Berlin. From 1895 to 1900 (like 
Bauer) he worked as a cartoonist for the Lustige Blaetter, Berlin. He exhibited in the Glass- 
palast in 1904, and in 1910 at the Berlin Secession. He later taught Cubism at the Bauhaus in 
Weimar until 1926 and at Dessau Bauhaus until 1933. A great exhibition of all his works was 

48 



held at the Crown Prince Palace, Berlin, in 1931. He still is a musician and sometimes com- 
poses. Except for one year in Paris and a short period of teaching at the Mills College in the 
United States, he always has lived in Germany. 

GLEIZES, Albert. Born in Paris, 1881. His paintings have been exhibited in Paris at the Societe 
Nationale des Beaux Arts in 1902 and 1907; at the Salon dAutomne in 1903, 1905 and 1910; 
at the Salon des Independants since 1909; and at the Salon des Tuileries since its found- 
ing. He took part in the first Cubistic movement in 1911 and was one of the founders of 
the Salon de la Section d'Or in 1912, as well as a member of the "Sturm," Berlin. Since 
1916 most of his paintings can be termed abstract. Gleizes is also a lecturer and writer. 
His published works include: "Du Cubisme", in collaboration with Jean Metzinger, Paris, 
1912; "Du Cubisme et des moyens de la comprendre", Paris, 1920; "La Mission creatrice de 
I'Homme dans le domaine plastique", Paris, 1922; and "Vers une conscience plastique", 
articles and lectures from 191 1 to 1925, Paris,1926. He has illustrated "Le Bocage amoureux", 
by Roger Allard; "La Conque miraculeuse", by Alexander Mercereau; and "Au pays du 
muftie", by Laurent Tailhade. He lives in Moly Sabata, France. 

KANDINSKY, Vasily. Born in Moscow, Russia, 1866. When he was eighteen he graduated in 
law and economics. In 1910 he was asked to teach at the University of Dorpat. Instead of 
accepting he went to Munich to study art at the Azbe School, later studying with Stuck. From 
1902 to 1903 he conducted an art school and then traveled until 1908. He lived in Munich 
until 1912. His first abstract painting was completed in 1911. In 1912 he founded the group 
of "Blauer Reiter" and published a book with the same title. He painted a scenic composition, 
"Le Son jaune", in 1912 and "Klaenge" in 1913. His works were exhibited in the Berlin 
"Automne Salon" in 1914 and in the "Sturm", Berlin, 1913-1918. Later in most all important 
cities. He returned to Russia in 1914. He was a professor at the Beaux Arts School and 
director of the museum of Pictorial Culture at Moscow in 1919. He established the Institute 
of Artistic Culture and was a professor at the University of Moscow in 1920. In 1921 he 
founded the Russian Academy of Arts and Sciences. He returned to Germany as a teacher 
at the Bauhaus in Weimar in 1922, later teaching at Dessau until 1933. His books include: 
"Uber das Geistige in der Kunst", Munich, 1912 (English edition, London, 1914); "Der Blaue 
Reiter", edited by Kandinsky and Franz Marc, Munich, 1912; "Kandinsky, 1901-1913", Berlin, 
1913; "Kleine Welten", Berlin, 1922; and "Punkt und Linie zu Flaeche", Munich, 1926. He 
lives in Paris. 

KLEE, Paul. Born in Berne, Switzerland, 1879. He studied at the Academy of Munich with 
Franz Stuck in 1898. He traveled through Italy and then made his home in Berne from 1903 
until 1906. His first exhibit, shown 1910, was unsuccessful, but later he attracted great atten- 
tion in the exhibition of "Blauer Reiter", of which he was a member in 1912 and at the 
"Automne Salon" in Berlin, 1913. He also exhibited as a member of the "Sturm." In 1919 he 
was a teacher at Bauhaus in Weimar, and later at Dessau, until 1932 he was a teacher at 
the Academy in Dusseldorf. His works have been shown all over the world. He lives in 
Switzerland. 

LEGER, Fernand. Born in Argentan, France, 1881. For a short time he studied architecture at 
the Ecole des Beaux Arts in 1901. He worked at first as an architectural draftsman and a 

49 



photographic retoucher. Then he began painting and, although influenced by the works of 
Cezanne, Rousseau and the Cubist movement, he developed a very strong style of abstrac- 
tion, using a subject but also occasionally painting non-objective creations. His paintings 
were first exhibited at the Berlin "Automne Salon", 1914, and later at the "Sturm", Berlin, 
1914-1919. He designed settings for "Skating Rink" and "Birth of the World", and for the 
Swedish ballets organized by Rolf de Mare and Jean Borlin. He now directs an art school 
with A. Ozenfant. He had a one-man exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 
1935 and in most cities of many continents. He lives in Paris. 

MARC, Franz. Born in Ried, upper Bavaria, 1880. He studied at the Munich Academy from 
1900 to 1903. In 1902 he travelled to Italy and in 1903 he went to Paris where he stayed six 
months. He lived in Munich from 1904 to 1905, in 1906 he visited Greece, leaving there to 
again visit Paris and Berlin in 1907. From 1907 to 1914 he lived in Sindelsdorf, Bavaria. He 
developed from Academism to Cubism as a painter of animal life. His greatest work is 
"Tierschiksale". He was killed at Verdun, March 4th, 1916. 

MODIGLIANI, Amedeo. Born in Livorno, Italy, 1884, died in Paris, 1920. He was both a 
painter and a sculptor. After studying the old masters in Naples, Florence and Venice, he 
arrived in Paris in 1905. His work was exhibited at the Salon des Independants in 1908-1910, 
and at the Salon dAutomne, Paris, 1919-1920. He was influenced by the Italian Primitives and 
African Sculpture. Many of his portraits were those of his friends. His life in Paris was one of 
poverty, illness and disillusionment. He died of consumption at the age of thirty-five. 

MOHOLY-NAGY, Ladislaus. Born in Hungary, 1895. From legal studies he turned to painting 
in 1915, and since then has been identified with the development of non-objective paint- 
ing in Europe. He was a member of the staff of the Bauhaus at Weimar, and later he was at 
Dessau with Cropius. In 1929 he went to Berlin where he worked in abstract films, stage 
settings, photography, writing and painting. His paintings have been exhibited in Berlin and 
Paris. His writings include "Malerei, Fotographie, Film," Munich, 1925; "The New Vision," 
New York, 1933; and "Sonderausgabe der Zeitschrift Telehor," 1935. He lives in London. 

NEBEL, Otto. Born in Berlin, Germany, 1892. Painter, poet and writer on art. He studied 
architecture from 1913 to 1918. Started non-objective painting in 1910. He became a mem- 
ber of the "Sturm" in 1919, and in 1920 of the "Krater" in Berlin. He lives in Switzerland. 

NICOLSON, Ben. Born in Denham, England, 1894. Mostly does works in relief but some- 
times also paints. From 1925 to 1936 he was a member of 7 and 5, in London, and from 1933 
a member of "Unit One". He lives in London. 

PICASSO, Pablo. Born in Malaga, Spain, 1881. Began to paint early in La Ceruna as the 
pupil of his father. He later studied in the Academy of Barcelona, from where he visited Paris 
in 1900. He has lived in Paris since 1903. His first studies of space problems were made in 
1907 and his first Cubistic landscapes were painted in 1908. His period of importance is 
that of pure Cubism from 1911 to 1914. Since 1917 he works in many styles, Academic, Im- 
pressionistic, Expressionistic and Surrealistic, usually inspired by works or ideas of other 
artists. Recent works of mere decoration show no development nor sincere growing. 

50 



REBAY von Ehrenwiesen, Hilla. Born at Strassburg, Alsace. She studied at Duesseldorf, the 
Paris Academy and the Munich Academy. Her paintings were exhibited at the Wallraf 
Museum in Cologne in 1914; at the Secession in Munich, 1914-1915; at the Salon des Inde- 
pendents in Paris in 1913; at the Freie Secession in Berlin, 1915; and at the "Sturm" in 1917. 
She was a member of the November Gruppe in 1918, and in 1920 a member of the 
"Krater". Exhibited at the Salon des Tuileries and Salon d'Automne, Paris, 1932-1933. She 
exhibited her paintings in several French and American museums and galleries, also in Italy 
and Switzerland. Her work has developed from Academism through Impressionism, Expres- 
sionism and Cubism to non-objective painting. She is known for her paper plastic pictures, 
and is a lecturer and writer on art. She lives in New York. 

SEURAT, Georges-Pierre. Born in Paris, 1859, died, 1891. He studied at the Ecole des Beaux 
Arts from 1875 to 1880. He painted in Paris from 1880 until his death. An indefatigable 
worker, he only sold one painting during his lifetime. Not until years after his death was 
his work appreciated. With Paul Signac, he founded Neo-lmpressionism and used com- 
plementary colors in small dots. His first works were abstractions. He died at the age of 
thirty-one. 

SHWAB. No information regarding his birth or other data is available concerning this 
young, but great master of non-objective painting. He lives in isolation in Switzerland where 
he was born. 

WADSWORTH, Edward. Born in Cheakheaton, England, 1889. When Cubism appeared in 
England in 1910 he was prepared to understand and appreciate it. He made his debut in the 
Vorticist movement started by Wyndham Lewis, the first to import Cubism into England. His 
first one-man show was at the Leiscester Galleries in 1919. He is a member of "Unit One," a 
group of eleven English artists with mutual sympathies. He lives in England. 



51 




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COPYRIGHT, 1937 BY H. REBAY V. EHRENWIESEN, CARNEGIE HALL, NEW YORK 



PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. BY HARVEY ROSENBERG AT THE BRADFORD PRESS, INC., NEW YORK